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Traumatic Brain Injury in Children
A traumatic brain injury or TBI is often the result of a traumatic experience such as a fall or motor vehicle accident. About one-third of all injury-related deaths are caused by TBI, and according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, brain injuries affect 1.7 million people each year. For children and young adults between ages 5-24, motor vehicle accidents were the leading cause of a TBI. Sports is also a leading cause of these types of injuries. In 2009, nearly 250,000 children under the age of 19 were treated in emergency rooms for a brain injury.

Traumatic brain injuries can vary in ‘type’ as some are considered mild while others may be severe, leading to life-long complications.

Common Symptoms of a Traumatic Brain Injury
Unfortunately, a brain injury cannot always be detected immediately after it is sustained is sustained and issues with brain function may not be easily apparent until the victim tries to perform complex tasks.

Some signs that someone you loved one may be suffering from a traumatic brain injury include:

  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Personality changes
  • Restlessness
  • Impaired judgment

According to a CDC.gov study in 2009, approximately 250,000 children (age 19 or less ) were treated for TBI or concussion caused by sports activity or recreation related injuries in U.S. hospitals and emergency rooms. The Leading causes of traumatic brain injury among American adults are auto accidents and slip and fall accidents, as well as violence and falling objects. Concussions and TBI in children are most often caused by car accidents, falls, abuse and sports – including football, soccer, boxing, hockey and basketball.

Consequences of a Brain Injury in a Child
The road to recovery may be a long and difficult one for victims of traumatic brain injury, and this is especially true in children. A long recovery can result in costly medical bills, medication, hours of physical therapy, or in-home care.

Depending on the extent of the injury, the victim may experience the following consequences:

  • Slurred speech
  • Memory problems
  • Mood swings
  • Impaired cognitive thinking
  • Reduced attention and concentration

Unfortunately, in children, these types of injuries can lead to lifelong cognitive impairments that can affect their school life and interpersonal relationships with family and friends.

As a leading authority on TBIs in children, David Dwork has focused his practice on obtaining compensation and justice on behalf of injured children and their families. For more than 30 years, he has helped families who have been devastated when their young children suffered a brain injury.

If your child has suffered a brain injury as a result of someone else’s negligence, contact David Dwork for legal help.